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Page

Réfer. : AL2401
Auteur : Arthur Edward Waite.
Titre : The Hermetic Museum.
S/titre : Containing Twenty-Two Most Celebrated Chemical Tracts.

Editeur : Samuel Weiser. York Beach, Maine 03910 (U.S.A.).
Date éd. : 1991 .




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Ce document étant sujet à droits d'auteur, n'est composé que du début, et des tables éven-
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**** A T T E N T I O N ****



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T H E H E R M E T I C M U S E U M
RESTORED AND ENLARGED.
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THE
H E R M E T I C M U S E U M,
RESTORED AND ENLARGED:
MOST FAITHFULLY INSTRUCTING ALL DISCIPLES OF THE SOPHO-SPAGYRIC
ART HOW THAT GREATEST AND TRUEST MEDICINE OF
THE PHILOSOPHER'S STONE

MAY BE FOUND AND HELD.
-------
NOW FIRST DONE INTO ENGLISH FROM THE LATIN ORIGINAL PUBLISHED AT
FRANKFORT IN THE YEAR 1678.
Containing Twenty-two most celebrated Chemical Tracts.
-------
COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME
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SAMUEL WEISER, INC. ------------------- York Beach, Maine
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First paperback edition in 1991 by
Samuel Weiser, Inc.
Box 612
York Beach, Maine 03910

First published in one volume in 1990
Originally published in London in two volumes in 1893
Reissued by Watkins Books, London in 1953
Reprinted in the United States of America by
Samuel Weiser in 1973

ISBN 0-87728-733-3
Library of Congress Card Number: 73-76951
EB

Printed in the United States of America

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T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S.
---
---
Preface to the English edition .................. vii Preface to the Original edition.................. xi
Volume I
The Golden Tract . The Golden Age Restored . The Sophic
Hydrolith . A Demonstration of Nature . A Short Tract .
The Only True Way . The Glory of the World . A Tract of
Great Price . A Very Brief Tract . The Book of Lambspring
. The Golden Tripod.

Volume II
The Chemical Treatise of Thomas Norton . The Testament of
Cremer . The New Chemical Light . The New Chemical Light,
Second Part . An Open Entrance to the Closed Palace of the
King . A Subtle Allegory Concerning the Secrets of Alchemy
. The Three Treatises of Philalethes I . The Three Treatises
of Philalethes II ¨ The Three Treatises of Philalethes III .
John Frederick Helvetius' Golden Calf . The All-Wise
Doorkeeper.

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P R E F A C E
TO THE ENGLISH EDITION.
---------
T HE HERMETIC MUSEUM RESTORED AND ENLARGED was published in Latin at Frankfort, in the year 1678, and, as its title implies, it was an enlarged form of an anterior work which, appearing in 1625 is more
scarce, but, intrinsically, of less value. Its design was apparently
to supply in a compact form a representative collection of the
more brief and less ancient alchemical writers; in this respect,
it may be regarded as a supplement to those large storehouses
of Hermetic learning such as the Theatrum Chemicum, and
that scarcely less colossal of Mangetus, the Bibliotheca Chemica
Curiosa, which are largely concerned with the cream of the
archaic literature, with the works of Geber and the adepts of the
school of Arabia, with the writings attributed to Hermes, with
those of Raymond Lully, Arnold de Villa Nova, Bernard
Trevisan, and others.
THE HERMETIC MUSEUM would also seem to represent a distinctive school in Alchemy, not altogether committed to
certain modes and terminology which derived most of their
prestige from the past, and sufficiently enigmatical as it was,
still inclined to be less obscure and misleading than was the

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viii THE HERMETIC MUSEUM.
habit of the older masters. For it belonged to a period
which had inherited a bitter experience of the failures, impostures,
and misery surrounding, the Magnum Opus and its
mystical quest, which was weary of unequipped experiment,
weary of wandering " multipliers," and pretentious " bellows-
blowers," while it was just being awakened to the conviction
that if Alchemy were true at all, it was not to be learned
from books, or, at least, from any books which had hitherto
been written on the subject. Running through all the tracts
which are comprised in the following volumes, the reader will
recognize traces of a central claim in alchemical initiation --
that the secrets, whatever they were, must be understood as
the property of a college of adepts, pretending to have
subsisted from time almost immemorial, and revealing themselves
to the select and the fed, while the literature, large as
it is, appears chiefly as an instrument of intercommunication
between those who knew. At the same time, it may also
be regarded as a sign and omen to the likely seeker,
an advertisement that there was a mystery, and that he must
go further who would unravel it.
While the treatises now translated are for the most part anonymous, as befits veiled masters, the literary reader will
remember that the name of John de Meung connects the
allegorical " Romance of the Rose" with the parables of
Alchemy; Flamel will be familiar to all Hermetic students
as the most celebrated of the French adepts; the saintly
name of Basil Valentine, investigator of the properties of
antimony, will not even now be unhonoured by the chemist;
Eirenaeus Philalethes, equally revered and unknown by all
devout Spagyrites, is supposed to have been the most lucid

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PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION. ix
of hierophants, and the " Open Entrance " to be the clearest
of all his works. Helvetius was an illustrious chemist, and
Michael Maier is a person of some repute the the Rosicrucian
controversy. Michael Sendivogius was an uninstructed disciple
of Alexander Seton, and the " New Chemical Light," which
he published and claimed as his own, was really the work of
his master, who has been called the chief martyr of Alchemy.
It may be added in this connection that some critics have
cast doubt upon the genuine nature of the " Testament of
John Cremer," and it is true that the annals of Westminster
do not include an abbot of that name.
It should be understood that the writer of this brief note must not be accredited with the translation which it seeks
to introduce. That is the work of a gentleman who is said
to have had a life-long acquaintance with alchemical literature;
it has been subjected to a searching revision at the
hands of the present editor, who may himself be permitted
to claim some experience in Hermetic antiquities; the version
as it stands does not uncreditably represent both the spirit
and the sense of the original without the original's prolixity.
While affording to the modern student of secret doctrines an
unique opportunity for acquiring in English a collection of
alchemical writers, this edition of THE HERMETIC MUSEUM
also claims consideration at the hands of the historian as a
contribution of real value to the early history of chemistry.

ARTHUR EDWARD WAITE.
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T H E P R E F A C E
O F T H E O R I G I N A L E D I T I O N.
------- ADDRESSED TO THE CANDIL READER. -------
I T would be unjust to doubt, most gentle reader, that of all the arts invented for the use of life by the reason of man, that of Alchemy is the most noble and glorious.
For all philosophers exclaim, as it were, with one voice,
albeit in many languages, that this art is not only true, but
(after the Divine Law by which our souls are saved) the best
and most magnificent gift bestowed upon man by God; and
that it should therefore be investigated with all zeal and with
the greatest pains. But as good wine needs no praise, so
neither does this art require a herald; for its truth is undoubted,
and its utility in human life universally acknowledged, and
strewn forth, not only in the Art of Medicine, in Pharmacy, and
many other sciences, but more especially in the Art of Transmuting
Metals, is so clearly and perspicuous!, demonstrated,
that it in no way requires to be adorned by the splendour of
oratory, or tricked out with the device of language. I will not
enlarge upon the blessing which the elaboration of minerals and
metals has bestowed upon our race. I merely point it out, but
refrain from discussing it at length. Different men devote
themselves to the study of this science from different motives.
The philosopher is impelled by the love of truth, and the thirst
after wisdom. He delights in knowledge for its own sake. He

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xii THE HERMETIC MUSEUM.
welcomes every elegant and copious treatise on the marvels of
Nature, to the glory of Almighty God. This is a sufficiently
generous reward for a philosopher. He has at his command
the most effectual means of becoming rich, if he would only
use them. But he is fired by the love of philosophy, and does
not care for the mocking grandeur of fortune. So thought the
Sages of the Saracens, Egyptians, Arabs, and Persians; for
when they were oppressed by tyrants, and violently driven into
exile, they protected and supported themselves by means of
their Art, and, through their knowledge of the transmutation
of metals, they had at their command, not only sufficient to
live upon, but all the comforts and pomp of life, and thus
practically demonstrated that they could obtain all that gold
and silver could give. Concerning this true transmutation of
metals, which is accomplished only by the Elixir or Stone of
the Philosophers, we here propose to speak. This art is set
forth in a series of treatises by different authors, which appeared
several years ago, and, like the present volume, was entitled
" A Museum of Hermes." But many writers having discussed
this subject, and treated it from various points of view (so that
one writes more clearly than another, and each throws light on
the other's meaning), some of my friends, who are adepts in
this Art, urged me to add to the former collection certain
treatises supplementary of those already given. For though that
former collection contained the most select writings on the subject,
yet it was not as complete as it might have been, nor was it
calculated to furnish to the reader in full measure the eagerly
expected fruit of his study. To this wish of my friends I have
all the more readily submitted, because its fulfilment must
redound to the advantage of the student. I have, therefore,
enlarged the collection with several most select treatises, and
caused it to be adorned with many engravings. I was most
strongly impelled to undertake the task by this consideration,
viz., that through the fraudulent machinations of greedy
impostors many false, so-called chemical treatises have been put
forward, in which there is not a single spark of truth, and that
very many have been, and are still being deceived by them.
These dupes, by reading this book, in which the Magistery of the
Stone is most clearly and plainly set forth, and into which no

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PREFACE TO ORIGINAL EDITION xiii
error or forgery has been admitted, will be secured against the
imposture of that wicked and mercenary band who delight in
fraud For in this book all errors are strewn up and dispelled.
For this reason I confidently offer this volume to the sons of
knowledge, in order that while they think upon and investigate
the secret working of Nature, they may obtain from it nothing
but the truth, and gain a clear insight into the very nature of
things. In this alone consists the perfection of the entire
most Holy Art of Philosophy. Only let them go forward along
the Royal Road which Nature prescribes in all her operations.
As to the rest, I heartily beg the friends of this Art to give a
kindly reception to the present volume, and when, through the
Will of God, by constant labour, they have put ashore in the
desired haven of philosophy, after the manner of philosophers
to exclude all that are unworthy from the knowledge thereof,
and, being mindful of charity towards their needy neighbour
in the fear of God (without any vain ostentation), to sing eternal
praises to the Good and Thrice Great God for this Wonderful
and Divine Gift (without any abuse thereof) in a silent and
devoutly joyful heart.

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T H E H E R M E T I C M U S E U M

RESTORED AND ENLARGED.
VOLUME I
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Quae sunt in superis, haec inferioribus insunt: Quod monstrat coelum, id terra frequenter habet Ignis, Agua et fluitans duo sunt contraria: felix, Talia si jungis: sit tibi scire satis! D.M. à C.B.P.L.C.
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T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S.
--- V O L U M E I. --- Page. I. -- THE GOLDEN TRACT concerning the Stone of the Philosophers, by an Anonymous German Adept 5
II. -- THE GOLDEN AGE RESTORED: Having now appeared a second time, flourished beautifully, and brought forth fragrant and Golden Seed. This rare and precious Seed is strewn and imparted to all the Sons of True Wisdom and the C)octrine, by Henry Madathanas ... ... ... ... ... 51 III. -- THE SOPHIC HYDROLITH; or, Water Stone of the wise,
that is, a Chemical Work, in which the Way is strewn, the Matter named, and the Process described; namely, the Method of obtaining the Universal Tincture ... ... ... ... ... 69
IV. -- A DEMONSTRATION OF NATURE, made to the erring Alchemists, and complaining of the Sophists and other False Teachers. Set forth by John A. Mehung 121
V. -- A SHORT TRACT, or PHILOSOPHICAL SUMMARY, by Nicholas Flamell ... ... ... ... 141
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Page. VI. -- THE ONLY TRUE WAY; or, an useful, good, and helpful Tract, pointing out the Path of Truth 149
VII. -- THE GLORY OF THE WORLD; or, Table of Paradise;
that is to say, a True Account of the Ancient Science which Adam learned from God Himself; which Noah, Abraham, and Solomon held as one of the Greatest Gifts of God; which also all Sages, at all times, preferred to the wealth of the whole world, regarded as the Chief Treasure of the whole world, and bequeathed only to Good Men; namely, the Science of the Philosopher's Stone .. ... ... 165
VIII. -- A TRACT OF GREAT PRICE, published by a German
Sage in the year 1423, under the following title: The True Teaching of Philosophy concerning the Generation of Metals and their True Origin . 245
IX. -- A VERY BRIEF TRACT CONCERNING THE PHILOSOPHICAL STONE. Written by an unknown German Sage, about 200 years ago, and called The Book of Alze 259
X. -- THE BOOK OF LAMBSPRING, a noble ancient Philosopher, concerning the Philosophical Stone, by Nicholas Barnaud Delphinas ... ... ... ... 271
XI. -- THE GOLDEN TRIPOD; or, Three Choice Chemical Tracts, namely: That of Basilius Valentinus, a Monk of the Benedictine Order, called Practica, with Twelve Keys and an Appendix ... ... 307
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The Golden Tract.
The Golden Age Restored.
The Sophic Hydrolith.
A Demonstration of Nature.
A short Tract, or Philosophical Summary.
The only True Way.
The Glory of the World.
A Tract of Great Price.
A very brief Tract concerning the Philosophical Stone.
The book of Lambspring.
The Golden Tripod.

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T H E H E R M E T I C M U S E U M

RESTORED AND ENLARGED.
VOLUME II
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T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S.
--- V O L U M E II. --- Page. I. -- THE CHEMICAL TREATISE of Thomas Norton, the Englishman, called Believe-Me, or The Ordinal of Alchemy . ... ... ... ... ... 1
II. -- THE TESTAMENT OF CREMER, Abbot of Westminster and Brother of the Benedictine Order. ... 69

III. -- THE NEW CHEMICAL LIGHT, Drawn from the Foun-
tain of Nature and of Manual Experience. By Michael Sendivogius ... ... ... ... 79
IV. -- THE NEW CHEMICAL LIGHT, Second Part, Concerning Sulphur. By Michael Sendivogius ... ... 127
V. -- AN OPEN ENTRANCE TO THE CLOSED PALACE OF THE KING. BY an Anonymous Sage and Lover of Truth (i.e., Eirenaeus Philalethes).. ... 159

VI. -- A SUBTLE ALLEGORY CONCERNING THE SECRETS OF ALCHEMY, very useful to possess and pleasant to read. By Michael Maier. ... ... ... 199
VII. -- THE THREE TREATISES OF PHILALETHES. 1. The
Metamorphosis of Metals ... ... ... 225
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Page. VIII. -- THE THREE TREATISES OF PHILALETHES. II. A
Short Vade Mecum or Guide to the Celestial Ruby ... ... ... ... ... ... 246
IX. -- THE THREE TREATISES OF PHILALETHES. III. The Fount of Chemical Truth ... ... ... 261
X. -- JOHN FREDERICK HELVETIUS' GOLDEN CALF, which the World worships and adores: in which is discussed the Most Rare Miracle of Nature in the Transmutation of Metals, viz.: How at the Hague a Mass of Lead was in a Moment of Time changed into Gold by the Infusion of a Small Particle of our Stone ... ... ... ... ... 271
XI. -- THE ALL-WISE DOORKEEPER, or a Fourfold Figure, exhibiting analytically to all who enter this Museum the Mosaico-Hermetic Science of Things above and Things below ... ... ... ... 301
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The Chemical Treatise.
The Testament of Cremer.
The New Chemical Light.
The New Chemical Light, Second Part.
An open Entrance to the closed Palace of the King. A subtle Allegory concerning the Secrets of Alchemy.
The Three Treatises of Philalethes. I.
The Three Treatises of Philalethes. II.
The Three Treatises of Philalethes. III.
John Frederick Helvetius' Golden Calf.
The all-wise Doorkeeper.


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Début de l'ouvrage Texte précédent Texte suivant Fin de l'ouvrage Drapeau Page d'aide Retour. Flag Help frame Return. Bandera Página de ayuda Vuelta.
Flagge Hilfeseite Rückkehr. Flag Hjælp side Tilbage. Bandiera Guida Torna.